Gatherer Jacket from Merrell

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Assignment 1:Step B
                     Sticky Light

StickyLampFinal1.jpg

Chris Kabel designed the “Sticky Lamp” for Droog Design. The Sticky Lamp is like a sticker. It is as simple as peel and stick. The Sticky Lamp is a light bulb in a plastic case, which contains a socket. On the edge, there are the sticky rings, which helps the lamp stays on wherever we located it. The on and off button for the Sticky Lamp is a clicker with an extended power cord connects to the socket. It has a weight of 0.35g and the size of 18x25x7cm. The Sticky Lamp is made of PVC and required a 6 watts light bulb. It gives the users a cozy atmosphere. The designer Chris Kabel says "The design brings a new function to packaging. The plastic,
which would normally be discarded, has become the casing. The self-adhesive fixings offers endless possibilities. You can stick it wherever you want, on the ceiling, the door, wall or door." The Sticky Lamp is convenient and environmental friendly. People would usually throw away plastic casings. However, Chris Kabel has made it work together.


From the approach of Chris Kable’s design, the sticky lamp, he wants to redefine human behavior. His design principal was to let user define it’s functionality but not the designer himself. From the product, you can tell that Chris Kable wants to change the way people interpret with the materials from the second they purchase the product. From the wrapping to the product itself, every material has its own purposes, making it more environmental friendly which they now call 1UP (100% Userful Packaging) design ethic. The only criticized it had from mostly online forum and comments are the use of materials, which is made out of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is a non-recyclable material, therefore the packaging itself is one hundred percent useful, but it is going to be one hundred percent useless after it’s been discarded.


The inspiration that Chris Kable had for this product was from a book full of photographs that he made, “One of these photographs pictured a lamp fitting that was taped against the wall to provide instant light. I translated this into the Sticky Lamp. It still has the immediacy and randomness of the original, but has been transposed into a sellable product.”


Assignment 1: Step A (Martin Chan Only)

Representative Images

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hand-drawn sketch

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This piece of design, the Gatherer jacket by Merrell, is a really thoughtful piece of design without anything high tech incorporated. The Gatherer jacket is equipped with insulation pocket through the jacket’s body and sleeve. User can use from a variety of different materials, from toilet paper (indoor) to leaf (outdoor) from the ground, it could be any found materials that will keep the user warm. Merrell himself said, “We all know how quickly the weather can change from comfortable, to cold and back. Our Gatherer jacket lets the wearer adjust their own climate to the conditions using adaptive insulation pockets through the body and sleeve… The only limit to your ability to stay warm is your imagination.” It is up to the user’s need to adjust the warmth that will be given from their Gatherer jacket.


Critical comments found Online

The overall critical comments that were found online are leaning toward the negative side, since there was a fairly similar piece that was designed in 1993 by Tsumura (Japan). Also, the comments were also criticizing about the look of the jacket, “Taxi’s jacket is wayyyyy better looking than this Merrell one,” or “Interesting… a new way to spend ungodly sums of money to look like a homeless person. This is the best idea since dyed to look filthy and artificially worn out jean”.


Links:

http://www.merrell.com/US/Shop/Product.aspx?AltNavID=WAP-G-JCK&SID=34443|
http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2008/01/25/merrell-gatherer-jacket.html
http://www.inhabitat.com/2008/06/30/merrell-gatherer-jacket-stuff-your-jacket-to-keep-warm/

http://moondial.typepad.com/fashionabletechnology/2008/07/merrells-gather.html